Server Room Cooling



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Description

A server room is a room that houses computer servers. Server rooms usually contain headless computers, being connected remotely via KVM switch, Vitrual Network Computing or remote desktop and generally provide for several of servers that serve a number of clients.
Server Room Solutions, Data Centre Services, Building Systems, Structured Cabling
Server Room Solutions, Data Centre Services, Building Systems, Structured Cabling

Applications

A method for improving applications is virtualization. Virtualization can increase computing power in the same space and allows manangers to monitor data loads. The processor helps to detect sensory data, such as the temperature of the servers and other related devices.

How important is Server Room Cooling?


When it comes to data, there are various factors that must be considered. Everything from how the data is stored, to how it should be protected. One factor of keeping data protected is how to keep it cool. For large businesses, data is stored in server rooms or data centers. One constant challenge businesses face is to keep their server rooms and data centers cool. How important is Server Room Cooling? Well, without the use of proper cooling techniques, a server room can overheat. As a result, the servers can crash, causing loss of data, resources and a wealth of other problems throughout a system or network.

Server Room Specifications for Effective Server Room Cooling


Specifications are very important and must be considered for effective Server Room Cooling. The first of which, Server Room Design. Server Room design must minimize single point of failure and offer predictable up time by using consistent maintainability and fault-tolerance against failures in which a server or data may be lost. Next to be considered is Server Room Environment Control. In order to efficiently control the environment of a server room, an HVAC ( Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) unit should be used to provide constant temperature and humidity control in degrees C and the Relative Humidity (RH). The temperature and humitdity control are based on the standards for active or inactive server units. In addition to a HVAC unit, a built-in dehumidifier ( to remove excess moisture), a secondary cooling system and temperature alarm system is highly suggested. Following Server Room Environment Control, is Server Room Fire Suppression. For adequate fire suppression, a dry system or wet system with drainage should be employed to avoid leaks and condensation damage to the server units. All sleeves and conduits within the room should be "Fire Stopped." For added protection, two coats fire retardant paint should be used on walls or drywall over plywood can be just as effective. In order to protect Server Unit from Flood Damage, the location of the server units should be high and dry or on racks curbed to prevent flood damage. As equally important, there should be no moisture penetration through ceiling or water sources from above. Lighting fixtures within a server room should be placed precisely and emergency lighting is highly recommend. Following Server Room Lighting are the Electrical specifications. All server units and cables must be grounded. It is suggested that for Data power, a minimum of 2 duplex plug-3 wire 120vac should be used. If additional plugs are needed, additional plugs should be installed per specification and room expectations. It is also highly recommended that a separate power source (independent of the server units' power source) be used for the HVAC or AC unit. Lastly, it is highly recommended that the server room(s) be a Controlled Special Purpose Space, meaning the server rooms and the telecommunication rooms associated with it them, should be dedicated to their function solely. Unrelated equipment should be prohibited. This includes ductwork, piping, and building electrical work.

Ten Energy Saving Tips for Server Rooms

Server rooms consume a lot of energy and power causing them to overheat sometimes. There are many different ways of reducing energy to keep server rooms running efficiently, but these are the best options for saving energy, power, and money.

  1. Upgrade to lower power processors
  2. Install high efficiency supplies
  3. Utilize power management features
  4. Install blade servers
  5. Virtualize your server operations
  6. Use higher AC volatage power distribution methods
  7. Embrace cooling best practices
  8. Use variable capacity cooling
  9. Use supplement cooling technologies
  10. Invest in monitoring and optimization technologies

Most Common Server Room Cooling Methods


The cooling framework is a very important of a server room. The network of chillers, compressors and air handlers create the best computing environment. This ensures the life of the servers installed within and the very life of the organization they support.

Here are some classic examples of cooling systems:
1. Computer Room Air Conditioners (CRAC)
  • This method is Refrigerant-based. It is installed within the data center floor and connected to outside condensing units.
  • It operates by moving air throughout the data center with a fan system. This delivers cool air to the servers, and takes exhaust air from the room.

2. Computer Room Air Handler (CRAH)
  • Chilled water based, installed on data center floor and connected to outside chiller plant.
  • Moves air throughout the data center via fan system: delivers cool air to the servers, returns exhaust air from the room.
3. Humidifier
  • Usually installed within CRAC / CRAH and replace water loss before the air exits the A/C units. Also available in standalone units.
  • Ensures that humidity levels fall within ASHRAE's recommended range
4. Chiller
  • Produces chilled water by refrigeration process.
  • Delivers chilled water by pumps to CRAH.

Beginning In the early 2000s, Robert Sullivan, advanced the concept of hot aisle/cold aisle. By doing this he was attempting to achieve air separation within the server room. The design, aligns data center cabinets into alternating rows, and is know for enduring in critical facilities throughout the world and is widely regarded as the first step in improving airflow management. The arrangement, however, lacks precise air delivery and removal, leaving users a new set of challenges. The first of which is Bypassed Air. Bypassed are is the conditioned air that does not reach computer equipment. It escapes through cable cut-outs, holes under cabinets, misplaced perforated tiles or holes in the computer room perimeter walls. This limits the precise delivery of cold air at the server intake. Next Hot Air Recirculation. With Hot Air Recirculation heat enters the cold aisle, making the cooling network work harder at pushing colder air into the equipment to offset this mixing. Third, Hot Air Contamination prohibits the fans from receiving the warmest possible exhaust air. As a result their operation less efficient. Lastly, Hot spots may persist as a result of all of the above challenges.

Hot Aisle/Cold Aisle Configuration
Hot Aisle/Cold Aisle Configuration



Free Cooling
Free cooling brings Mother Nature into the data center. When the ambient temperature and humidity are favorable, an economizer system circumvents some of the cooling infrastructure and uses the outside air as a cooling mechanism.

Close-Coupled Liquid Cooling
Close-coupled liquid cooling expands further on air management and containment. The use of water and the proximity of the heat transfer increases efficiencies and enables some close-coupled cooling designs t o operate with elevated chilled water temperatures. Higher inlet water temperatures can reduce the energy needed for mechanical cooling and also maximize the amount of free cooling hours per year.


Rittal Liquid Cooling Package
Rittal Liquid Cooling Package

Close-Coupled Liquid Cooling
Close-coupled liquid cooling expands further on air management and containment. The use of water and the proximity of the heat transfer increases efficiencies and enables some close-coupled cooling designs to operate with elevated chilled water temperatures. Higher inlet water temperatures can reduce the energy needed for mechanical cooling and also maximize the amount of free cooling hours per year.

Elevated Chilled Water Temperatures
For facilities with a chiller infrastructure, the EPA recommends raising the water temperatures. Different sources estimate a traditional supply temperature between 42-45 deg F. A higher supply temperature yields higher efficiency for the chiller as it reduces energy consumption. Higher set points can also segue into water side economizers.
In a recent survey conducted by the Uptime Institute, enterprise data center managers responded that 39% of them expected that their data centers would run out of cooling capacity in the next 12-24 months and 21% claimed they would run out of cooling capacity in 12-60 months. The power required to cool IT equipment in your data center far exceeds the power required to run that equipment.

Developed to remove high levels of waste heat from server enclosures, this high density cooling solution utilizes LCP air/water heat exchanger providing uniform, effective and affordable cooling for servers and similar IT equipment. The special horizontal airflow of the Rittal LCP represents an adaptation of this widespread cooling principle, providing cooled air uniformly throughout the complete height of the enclosure.
The Liquid Cooling unit is a modular, upgradeable, and temperature-neutral cooling concept.
  • Up to 30kW cooling output, with three cooling modules possible per equipment rack
  • Controlled variable speed fan and water flow based on actual heat load generated in cabinet
  • Constant temperature cold air provided at the front intake for optimized equipment use, hot air removed from rear
  • Even air distribution along the entire height of the front 482.6 mm (19") mounting angles
  • Can be bayed between two 42U racks
  • High energy efficiency in removing waste heat with no temperature impact in the room


Rittal Liquid Cooling Package
Rittal Liquid Cooling Package




Links:
http://www.42u.com/cooling/liquid-cooling/liquid-cooling.htm
http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/netsys/article.php/3790796/The-Big-Chill-How-to-Cool-a-Small-Server-Room.htm
http://searchsystemschannel.techtarget.com/generic/0,295582,sid99_gci1245328,00.html#
http://www.42u.com/42u-rack-cooling.htm--Chara
http://searchsystemschannel.techtarget.com/generic/0,295582,sid99_gci1353781,00.html
http://www.amiktech.ca/networking/Server_Room_Design.htm
http://gcn.com/microsites/server-room/server-room-ten-ways.aspx
http://www.workspace-technology.com/server.html